Since 2010, Wesley Medical Center’s joint replacement program as performed more than 4,000 knee and hip replacement procedures for patients throughout Kansas.

Patients undergoing knee or hip replacement surgery will experience Wesley’s comprehensive care team approach that includes board certified surgeons, a dedicated nurse specialist to help manage the process, a nursing team trained in orthopedic care, experienced occupation and physical therapists and a personalized treatment care plan.

Wesley believes in keeping patients informed and involved in their health before, during and after the surgery to help ensure patient satisfaction. Wesley offers an education handout and pre-op class to help make patients feel more comfortable with the surgical and recovery process.

Hip Replacement

Hip replacements are generally related to need, not age. The hip joint is a “ball and socket” joint that is formed by two main parts: the round head of femur (the ball) and the acetabulum (the cup or socket in your pelvis). This structure allows the leg to move forwards, backwards, sideways an in rotating fashion.

In a normal hip joint, these two bones are coated with smooth articular cartilage that allows them to move again each other without friction or pain. In an arthritic or damaged hip, the cartilage layers are destroyed and bone rubs again bone causing pain and limiting motion. Hip joints damaged by injury or disease (such as arthritis) can be extremely painful, making everyday activities like walking or sitting down difficult.

To diagnose a hip problem, your surgeon will take a complete medical history and perform a physical examination. Along with these, diagnostic procedures may be performed including X-rays, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography scan (CT or CAT scan).

total-hip-replacementIn total hip replacement, the surgeon replaces an arthritic or injured joint with an artificial joint called a prosthesis. There are three basic parts to the artificial joint:

  • The acetabulum cup is a metal shell with a plastic liner which is placed into your hip socket
  • The femoral head (ball) snaps onto the stem and rotates just like a natural hip in the hip socket
  • The femoral stem is a metal shaft that is inserted into your thigh bone

The cup and stem are either cemented in place or designed to have your own bone grow and adhere to the implant. Your surgeon based on your age, bone density, medication and anatomy will select the type of replacement joint and how it is inserted into your hip.

Anterior Approach Hip Replacement

When appropriate, our surgeons use an advanced technique called direct anterior approach for hip replacement. This technique involves a three-to four-inch incision on the front of the hip that allows the surgeon to spare muscle by gently working around it rather than cutting through it. It also reduces the risk of dislocation and has been show to decrease pain and lead to a shorter recovery time. Your surgeon will discuss this option with you to determine if you are a good candidate for this technique.

Knee Replacement

The knee is the largest joint in the body and is affected by arthritis more than any other joint. The knee joint is a “hinge” style joint because like the hinges on a door, the motion allowed is back and forth. The knee also has the ability to rotate (turn) and translate (glide).

The knee joint is composed of three parts: femur (thigh bone), tibia (shin bone) and patella (knee cap). In a normal knee, these bones are covered with a smooth cartilage that cushions the bones and enables them to move easily. There are two groups of muscles in the knee: the quadriceps, located on the front of the thighs, which straighten the legs; and the hamstrings, located in the back of the legs, help bend the knee.

To diagnose a knee problem, your surgeon will take a complete medical history and perform a physical examination. Along with these, diagnostic procedures may be performed including X-rays, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography scan (CT or CAT scan).

total-knee-replacementTotal Knee Replacement

In the arthritic knee, the cartilage layers are destroyed resulting in bone rubbing against bone, which causes pain, muscle weakness and limited motion.

The diseased knee joint is removed and replaced with an artificial knee joint called a prosthesis. A knee prosthesis is made of a combination of metal and plastic or metal and ceramic. There are three basic parts to a replacement joint:

  • The femoral component covers your high bone
  • The tibial component covers the top of your shin bone
  • The patella component covers the underside of your knee cap

The components are either cemented in place or designed to have your own bone grow and adhere to the implant. Your surgeon based on your age, bone quality, conditions of your ligaments and the area of the knee affected will select the type of replacement joint. Your replacement joint is extremely strong and moves together to allow normal motion of the knee joint.

Partial Knee Replacement

For some people experiencing knee pain, there may only be damage on one side of the knee. For this patient, the partial, or unicompartmental, knee replacement may be a better option because only one side of the joint is resurfaced. More of the natural anatomy can be preserved, and many people get back to regular life faster than those who have a traditional knee replacement.

walking-knee-painLower Extremity Function Scale Pain Assessment 

Lower Extremity Function Scale Questionnaire

The lower extremity function scale questionnaire contains 20 questions about your ability to perform everyday tasks. The score provided by your answers is particularly valuable when monitored over time to evaluate the course and effectiveness of treatment.

If you are unsatisfied with your results, contact one of our orthopedic doctors today and set up a consultation or contact Megan Neel, Acute Care Clinical Coordinator Total Joint Replacement Program at (316) 962-3062 to learn more about Wesley’s joint replacement program.

Dr. PappademosWesley Joint Replacement Center Medical Director

Dr. Paul Pappademos, MD, is a fellowship-trained and board certified orthopedic surgeon specializing in knee arthroscopy, total knee arthroplasty, total hip arthroplasty, revision arthroplasty, and trauma surgery. Since 2005, Dr. Pappademos has practiced in Wichita, KS as a part of Advanced Orthopaedic Associates, a group of sixteen fellowship-trained and highly skilled, orthopaedic surgeons, all committed to excellence in orthopaedic surgery.

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